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Creative traditonal Chinese characters

เผยแพร่:   โดย: MGR Online

This picture taken on October 20, 2017 shows a visitor pointing at a board showing Chinese and English characters during an exhibition in Taipei. Sam Yeh/AFP
As a growing number of people around the world learn simplified Chinese instead of the more complicated traditional characters, young creatives in Taiwan are fighting to promote what they fear will become a dying art.

Introduced by the Chinese Communist Party in the 1950s to boost literacy, the simplified version of the script uses fewer strokes and is now the predominant writing system in the mainland.

Foreigners learning Chinese also tend to be taught the simplified characters, used in official documents by international organisations including the United Nations.

Even in Taiwan, where most people still use traditional characters, there is a growing tendency to opt for the more convenient simplified script.

And with an increasing number of the island's young people pursuing higher education and careers on the mainland, the influence of the simplified system is expanding.

Creators of a new Taiwanese app game called "Zihun" hope to help stem the tide.

Players assume the identities of literary figures from ancient China and compete on speed and accuracy in writing traditional characters.

From filling in the blanks to "word solitaire" -- using the last word of a phrase to create a new one -- or matching simplified characters with their traditional version, players write the answers on their smartphone screens with their fingers or touch pens.

Traditional Chinese script is a mixture of pictograph characters that represent objects, and ideographs that depict ideas or concepts.

Different or the same characters can form a compound word -- the word "forest" consists of three "wood" characters, for example.

There are rules to the formation of most characters but learning to write them depends heavily on memorisation.
This picture taken on November 2, 2017 shows Steve Tsai, an app designer of Zihun, instroducing his app during an interview in Taipei. Sam Yeh/AFP
This picture taken on November 2, 2017 shows Steve Tsai, an app designer of Zihun, pointing at traditional Chinese characters during an interview in Taipei. Sam Yeh/AFP
This picture taken on October 20, 2017 shows Wang Man-lin (L) and her counterpart Wang Chieh-ying displaying Chinese characters stamps during an exhibition in Taipei. Sam Yeh/AFP
This picture taken on October 20, 2017 shows visitors watching Chinese character with a stamp during an exhibition in Taipei. Sam Yeh/AFP
This picture taken on November 2, 2017 shows a man pointing at a traditional Chinese character next to a simplify one during an interview in Taipei. Sam Yeh/AFP
This picture taken on November 2, 2017 shows Steve Tsai, an APP designer of Zihun, displaying his smart phone showing traditional Chinese characters during an interview in Taipei. Sam Yeh/AFP
This picture taken on October 20, 2017 shows a boy stamping a Chinese character during an exhibition in Taipei. Sam Yeh/AFP
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